The Week in Review: May 6

VAM ANNOUNCES MAJOR HONG KONG PROJECT

The Vancouver Academy of Music (VAM) announced their involvement in the development of a brand new, world-class education music facility in Hong Kong, set in a remodeled 1930s mansion. The project, estimated to be worth $22 million, will feature architecture from Vancouver’s own Bing Thom Architects, with VAM providing support and expertise in creating a music curriculum for the school. VAM Executive Director, Joseph Elworthy, spoke with Global TV about this opportunity.

CUTTING EDGE GERMAN ART SEES MIXED SUCCESS

Germany has arguably one of the most progressive artistic scenes in Europe. Two new projects proved this, albeit with mixed results. A modern version of Richard Wagner’s opera, Tannhauser, ?has been cancelled following audience complaints that the production shows Jews being executed and incorporates Nazi officers into the story.

BOSON, Choreographie von Nadja Saidakova
Photo: Bettina St??

Berlin’s state ballet, however, received accolades for its partnership with a techno club to produce an avant-garde show. Critics have pointed to this as an example of beneficial collaboration in the thriving cultural scene.

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MICHAEL AUDAIN ANNOUNCES DETAILS OF WHISTLER MUSEUM

The Audain Art Museum, funded by philanthropist Michael Audain, has revealed its plans for a 55,0000 square foot museum in Whistler, BC – more than double the size originally proposed. If approved, the museum would be the largest purpose-built museum in the province. Despite its size, the low, L-shaped structure would not be obtrusive, says architect John Patkau, but rather a “very quiet participant within the forest.” The project will be completed by 2015.

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VANCOUVER OPERA USES EAST/WEST PERCUSSION FOR TEA

Members of the LMPR team greatly enjoyed Vancouver Opera’s recent production of Tea: A Mirror for the Soul – an enthralling production of originality and depth. The Globe & Mail’s Behind the Scenes photo gallery provides audiences an understanding of the unusual percussion instruments used in the production, from water draining from a strainer to a rubber ball rubbed against a Beijing Opera gong.? The percussionists using these methods worked without a score, using their years of experience to keep time.

The production's run? also coincidences with 2013 Opera America conference. Hosted by Vancouver Opera here in the city, the artistic summit will attract more than 400 leaders from across North America to present on and discuss the art, operation, and business of opera.

The opulent sets of Tea were accompanied by a complex, unusual score.

Categories: MPMG