The Week in Review: October 14

BANKSY IN NY

The infamous street artist Banksy is loose in New York this month, conducting the most unconventional of residencies.

The city-wide exhibition, called Better Out Than In, has seen the elusive figure paint trucks, erect sculptures, install video installations, and more. One particularly viral component saw the artist in Central Park, selling enormously valuable works for $60 each (he made just $420 over the course of a day).

MAN BOOKER PRIZE WINNER ANNOUNCED

At 28-years old, Canadian-born Eleanor Catton became the youngest person to ever win the Man Booker Prize this week. The author received the prestigious award for her novel?The Luminaries,?an intellectually rigourous murder mystery that takes place in Victorian-era New Zealand.

This also marks the final year that the award will be available exclusively to authors hailing from Britain,?Ireland, and the 54-nation Commonwealth of former British colonies. Beginning in 2014 all novels written in English and published in Britain will be eligible, regardless of the author's nationality.

HOPKINS PEN FAN LETTER

Legendary actor Anthony Hopkins wrote a fan-boy letter to?Breaking Bad?star Bryan Cranston. The impulse struck the actor following a marathon viewing of the recently-concluded series. The writing offers fascinating insight into both the film & television industry and Mr. Hopkin's rich depth of character.

KRONOS MARKS MILESTONE WITH LANDMARK PREMIERE

This Saturday, the Kronos Quartet will celebrate 40 years of performance and creation at a celebratory Chan Centre concert. The occasion will be marked with the world premiere of Philip Glass'?String Quartet No. 6 – the first piece the?eminent composer has written in this configuration in more than 20 years.

While conducting research for their interview with the group's founder, David Harrington, the CBC turned up this essential piece of pre-concert viewing:

EVIDENCE ARISES FOR NEW SHAKESPEARE

Every several years some individual comes forward alleging to have discovered a new play by William Shakespeare. The most recent claimant however, would seem to have a much stronger argument than some historic cases.

Using sophisticated linguistic and computer analysis, academic Johnathan Bate has identified 'fingerprints' of the Bard in three works: Arden of Faversham,?The Spanish Tragedy,?and?Mucedorus.?As a compelling endorsement of the discovery, the three plays will be included in an upcoming publication of the complete works whose collaborators include the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Categories: MPMG